DC on Thursday

Again, if you’re in a Reader, you won’t see the photos right below this. However, if you’re not? MY DC PHOTOS: LET ME SHOW YOU THEM.

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I had one major goal in DC: see my friend Quinn. I’ve known her since I was … 17, and I just realized that how I met her is a totally blogworthy story and I must remember to write it down. You will all laugh at me.

Quinn was able to get the day off from work, and we set out into The City (wheeee, subways!) in order to (a) maybe take the Duck Tour, (b) go to the Folklife Festival, and (c) hang out and have fun. Two out of three things were accomplished — we wound up not going on the Duck Tour because of timing issues. But we visited the Folklife Festival (and I wished so much that my spinning and weaving friends could see this!) and we dropped in on a few other monuments and gardens around The Mall. That’s one thing about so much in such a small city, you can’t really walk more than a block without seeing some sort of monument or statue or particular history something.

Like, for instance, walking from Union Station to The Mall. I saw, out of the corner of my eye, someone sitting in what looked like a rock-and-water garden. I glanced over and saw a quote that, if you know history, seemed to imply something about the Japanese Internment Camps (not generally taught in schools, and I’m always surprised when I meet someone who knows about this period of shameful, horrible treatment of our own people). I said I’d like to check it out, and sure enough — it turned out to be the “Memorial to Japanese-American Patriotism in World War II.”

Anyway. Not a bad day, and it ended with a great dinner at the Cutest. Place. Ever. More on that tomorrow!

5 Comments

  1. Whoa..it actually says “here we admit a wrong”? I’m honestly kinda shocked.

    I actually just pulled out my grad school books Obasan and Mothertalk (Canadian, but still about WWII and the internment camps) over the weekend to loan to my mom.

    • Whoa..it actually says “here we admit a wrong”? I’m honestly kinda shocked.

      Me too! I was out of high school (and I think even out of my first bout with college) when I first read about the camps, and was shocked and outraged that (a) it happened at all and then (b) that it wasn’t taught in schools so that we don’t repeat the horrible lessons of the past.

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